Scholars and Human Rights Organizations Demand End to U.S. Military and Police Aid in Honduras

June 7, 2012
Scholars and Human Rights Organizations Demand End to U.S. Military and Police Aid in Honduras
Contact:
Dr. Rodolfo Pastor Fasquelle (in Mexico City): (011 52) 5592-1238, email (best option) rpastorf@gmail.com
Dr. Adrienne Pine (in Washington, DC): (202) 652-5601, pine@american.edu
Dr. Marc Edelman (in New York City): (646) 286-4023, medelman@hunter.cuny.edu

Over 40 Honduran scholars, with the support of over 300 additional signatories from 29 countries (including over  200 signers from the U.S.) sent a letter to President Obama and Secretary of State Clinton today demanding an end to U.S. police and military aid, including training, to Honduras. The letter also demands that the U.S. submit to a Honduran popular referendum to determine whether U.S. military bases should remain in the country, rejecting the  Drug War as a reason for the increasing U.S.-led militarization of the country. It states:

Combating drug trafficking is not a legitimate justification for the U.S. to fund and train security forces that usurp democratic governments and violently repress our people. Everyone here in Honduras, including the staffers of your DEA offices in Tegucigalpa, know exactly who the drug traffickers are and where to find them. The most powerful drug lords in this country also financed and backed the coup that removed the few barriers to drug trafficking that existed; they are powerful princes of agribusiness, business and finance, large landowners and members of Congress. They have financed presidential campaigns, they have family ties to politicians at all levels and from all political parties. Some of them are allies of the U.S. embassy, which recognized…at least one of them as a drug trafficker. The problem is not that the police and armed forces lack resources and training. The police and armed forces are an integral part of the problem; many of their members are deeply complicit in the drug trade. They profit from transactions on South American product that passes through our country on its way to yours and on the residue that is distributed here…But those very few who dare to speak this truth from within have been tried for abuse of authority…or murdered…by U.S.-funded and trained Honduran police.
The academics’ letter follows May’s joint Honduran police-U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency raid that killed four innocent civilians and the news that soldiers deputized by Honduran President Porfirio Lobo to act as police officers and driving vehicles donated by the U.S. government shot and killed two teenagers last week for not stopping at a Tegucigalpa police road block.

Rodolfo Pastor Fasquelle, Professor of History at the Colegio de México, and former Honduran Minister of Culture, Arts and Sports, said today: “Since the Honduran signatories of our letter to Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton sent it to our friends and colleagues abroad to sign, high-level changes in the police institution have taken place. These
changes do not bode well. The national police are now under the control of even more corrupt figures than before, which constitutes both an admission that reforms have failed, and a reaffirmation of the Honduran state’s policy of giving impunity to the criminals within its security apparatus. It is not in the least reassuring to us, following the DEA massacre of innocent indigenous Miskitu people, to hear the U.S. Ambassador to Honduras Lisa Kubiske insisting that the end of U.S. involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan means that the military resources from those disastrous wars will be used in our country.”
The Honduran academics’ letter also references the ongoing bloody conflict in the Bajo Aguán region highlighted in the letter sent by 94 Members of Congress this March to Secretary Clinton, demanding a halt to military and police aid.

Marc Edelman, professor and department chair of the Department of Anthropology, and a member of the executive committee of the Human Rights Program at Hunter College, participated in the International Public Hearing on the Human Rights Situation of the Peasant Communities in the Bajo Aguán this May 28-30. He said today:
The International Public Hearing on the Human Rights Situation of the Peasant Communities in the Bajo Aguán, was held in Tocoa, Honduras on May 28. The Bajo Aguán region is the site of the most acute agrarian conflict in Central America in the past fifteen years. The Hearing highlighted the deeply troubling absence of effective institutions in Honduras. Testimony from peasant victims of human rights violations suggests that violence committed by the private security forces of large landowners, the National Police and the military frequently goes unpunished and that rural people have nowhere to turn to seek redress. Since the 2009 coup, Honduran human rights organizations have documented the assassinations of 48 individuals affiliated with peasant organizations in the Bajo Aguán, as well as those of a journalist covering the conflict and his pregnant wife. One peasant was also ‘disappeared’ in 2011 and remains missing. The entire zone has been militarized with the excuse of controlling drug trafficking, but it is the rural communities that have borne the brunt of the militarization.

Adrienne Pine, assistant professor at American University and author of Working Hard, Drinking Hard: On Violence and Survival in Honduras helped to collect signatures from colleagues in the U.S. She states: “94 Congress Members, hundreds of academics from Honduras and around the world, dozens of high-profile human rights and press freedom organizations, and citizens from Honduras and the U.S. are demanding the same thing of the Obama administration: stop funding and training the murderous Honduran police and military, and stop killing innocent Hondurans in the name of the War on Drugs. In the wake of the DEA-led massacre of pregnant women and children in the Moskitia, it is high time this administration start listening to citizens and experts. Rather than starting another unwinnable war against people in a nation ruled by a U.S. supported, coup-installed president, the U.S. should be spending its resources on shoring up our own democracy.”

The letter follows:

President Barack Obama
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton
Secretary of State
Washington, DC 20520
June 7, 2012

Dear Mr. President and Madame Secretary:

As Honduran scholars from diverse fields of study, men and women of science and art, with the solidarity of other Latin American scholars and scholars of Latin America from countries around the world, including of course the U.S.A., we call upon you to immediately suspend all military and police aid to Honduras until such time as those public institutions, plagued with corruption, have been cleaned up. We urge you to respect our sovereignty and declare our wish to submit to an open referendum the question of whether or not to permit the ongoing presence of U.S. military bases—one of which was used in the perpetration of the June 2009 coup d’état, a turning point in the worsening of so many of our troubles. And we demand that you respect the national and regional processes for confronting our current institutional breakdown. Let’s not kid ourselves. The current disaster in Honduran has an immediate explanation and roots in history, but it is most directly the result of your politics of “pragmatism” following the coup.

Your government waited months to classify what happened as a “coup” so that you could continue, without legal impediment, your assistance to the coup regime. The general elections of November 2009 were administered less than five months after the coup, under military control of the streets and plazas where the true opposition was repressed, without international monitors apart from the observers that your embassy and political parties arranged for, thus consolidating the coup regime, giving total impunity to the coup’s perpetrators and intensifying the collapse of the judicial and security institutions. Thanks to the amnesty declared by the resultant administration in 2010, no member of the military has been tried for participating in the June 2009 coup. No one has been investigated for the more than 4,000 crimes against humanity and human rights violations committed by the police and military forces under the dictatorship of Roberto Micheletti, since that would have required the intervention of the Public Ministry, which itself is still in the hands of notorious coup plotters and accomplices.

Impunity still reigns in the current regime; in the two years that this new administration has been in power, the police have committed nearly 3,000 new violations against human rights (not counting those committed by members of the armed forces), none of which has been brought to trial. The judiciary, whose Chief Justice, according to published cables, confessed to your representative in Tegucigalpa to having fabricated—a posteriori—the criminal charges and arrest warrant used to justify the coup d’état and with which members of the military involved were pardoned, continues absurdly denying a coup took place and has fired judges and DAs who denounced and opposed the coup and the policies of the coup regime, thereby preventing the judiciary from addressing unmitigated military and police violence with impartiality and neutrality. How could institutions led by coup leaders bring to justice police and armed forces for threatening, torturing, and murdering members of different groups in the opposition—teachers, union members, popular leaders, subsistence farmers, indigenous and Afro-Caribbean peoples and members of the LGTB community?

Our country is in shambles; in part thanks to U.S. “support.” We can never know what would have happened, but had the U.S. State Department respected Honduran and Latin American diplomatic processes following the coup, perhaps our country might not today be considered nationally and internationally as an example of a “failed state.” There might be some respect for authority and the rule of law. But instead your government betrayed of the unanimous declaration of the Organization of American States that President Manuel Zelaya should be unconditionally returned to his democratically-elected post in the days following the coup, and more recently encouraged a lack of respect for the Cartegena Accords signed by President Santos of Colombia and President Chávez of Venezuela. Meanwhile your government insists on elevating the fight against organized crime into a “War on Terror” that cannot be won, that serves to conceal further outrages, and that we may not survive, and has systematically ignored Latin American solutions, when we are the ones providing all the corpses in your war.

The direct effect of U.S. policy toward Honduras has been to further strengthen the hand of the very people responsible for plotting, carrying out, legitimating, and violently imposing the coup d’état: the armed forces, the court system, the attorney general’s office, the police and powerful business groups. Military officers who led the coup have been assigned top-level positions within the current administration of President Lobo. With “security” as an explanation, Honduran armed forces are no longer required to account for the resources they use and can now make purchases without a tendering process. The current Honduran administration has put our poorly respected civil liberties at greater risk by deputizing soldiers to act as police despite their not being trained for that function but instead having been trained to exterminate the enemy, and giving police, with the new wiretap law, broad powers to audit the personal communication of citizens requiring neither a judge’s nor a DA’s order. All this, in turn, has intensified the climate of insecurity in our country, where citizens often have more reason to fear security forces than they do drug traffickers and gangs.

Combatting drug trafficking is not a legitimate justification for the U.S. to fund and train security forces that usurp democratic governments and violently repress our people. Everyone here in Honduras, including the staffers of your DEA offices in Tegucigalpa, know exactly who the drug traffickers are and where to find them. The most powerful drug lords in this country also financed and backed the coup that removed the few barriers to drug trafficking that existed; they are powerful princes of agribusiness, business and finance, large landowners and members of Congress. They have financed presidential campaigns, they have family ties to politicians at all levels and from all political parties. Some of them are allies of the U.S. embassy, which recognized [in diplomatic cables written long before the coup] at least one of them as a drug trafficker. The problem is not that the police and armed forces lack resources and training. The police and armed forces are an integral part of the problem; many of their members are deeply complicit in the drug trade. They profit from transactions on South American product that passes through our country on its way to yours and on the residue that is distributed here. The problem is a deeply rooted culture of corruption and a lack of determination on the part of authority to clean up the police and armed forces. But those very few who dare to speak this truth from within have been tried for abuse of authority like former Minister Gautama B. Fonseca or murdered like former police commissioner Alfredo Landaverde, by U.S.-funded and trained Honduran police.

Mr. President and Madame Secretary, our goals for Honduras are the same that you claim to promote: security, democracy, and respect for the rule of law. We Hondurans need credible institutions that enjoy legitimacy and can reestablish the principle of democratic authority and laws allowing for coexistence. We call upon you to cut off your support (logistical, financial, and training) to the forces of disorder that are also the most violent institutions in our society, and to put an end to your occupation of our territory for military purposes without consulting the people of Honduras. Any subsequent reestablishment of your aid should depend on the verification of progress made by the recently established National Commission for the cleaning up [of the police], and the re-establishment of U.S. bases should have the support of the citizenry, determined through the ballot box.

But U.S. appeasement and support of the violent agents of a rogue state have destroyed our fledgling democracy, brought us greater insecurity and a human rights catastrophe. Investment in the depressed economy will do much more for our mutual goals than these counterproductive expenditures. We call upon you to allow us as Hondurans to seek our own solutions to our problems in order to progress toward building a peaceful coexistence. Only with sovereignty can we work toward the refounding of Honduras as democratic nation that respects rights. And U.S. policy should not continue to be an obstacle to that goal. History will see the emperor without his clothes on.

Honduran signatories:

Rodolfo Pastor Fasquelle
Historiador y Profesor de historia, Museo de San Pedro Sula
Emilio Guerrero
Escritor, analista político
Víctor M Ramos
Medico, Editor, periodista y Profesor de Medicina UNAH
Darío Euraque
Historiador, Profesor de historia, Trinity College
Carlos A. Bueso
Medico y político
Geraldina Tercero
Antropóloga
Héctor Martinez Motiño
Economista, Catedrático de Comercio Internacional
Aníbal Delgado Fiallos
Politólogo, ex Ministro del INA Catedrático UNAH
Hellen Umaña
Escritora y Profesora de letras UNAH y Universidad de Guatemala
Guillermo Mejía
Director de Medio de Publicación, El Salvador
Marlin Oscar AvilaEconomista, consultor técnico y escritor
Sonia Gómez
Periodista exiliada, Canada
Mario Ardon
Antropólogo, consultor
Ana Flores
Ejecutiva de Publicidad y Mercadeo, New Jersey
Germán Adolfo Guandique
Vicepresidente SITRAUNAH, Choluteca
Leslie Pineda
Economista y periodista, Tegucigalpa
Armando Licona
Presidente de Amistad Honduras Cuba
Reina Centeno
Coordinadora de la Misión ALBA
Amílcar Espinoza
Catedrático Coordinador de la Carrera UNAH
Rebeca Becerra
Escritora, administradora cultural
Eduardo Bähr
Escritor, Director de la Biblioteca Nacional y profesor U.P.F.M.
Wilfredo Flores
PHD en Ingeniería Eléctrica, consultor
Natalie Roque
Historiadora, Administradora cultural, UNAH
Gustavo Zelaya
Historiador, filósofo, catedrático UNAH
Enrique Reina
Diplomático, ex Embajador de Honduras en EUA, Director de OEA
José Antonio Funes
Diplomático, ex Ministro de Cultura, literato e historiador de la literatura
Cesar Lazo
Escritor, Catedrático UNAH, ex Director de INAHAnarella Vélez
Historiadora, Catedrática de Historia, UNAH
Jorge Alberto Amaya Banegas
Historiador, Catedrático de Historia UNAH y UPFM
Rosa María Mesen
Catedrática Universitaria, Milán, Italia
Rodolfo Pastor de Maria y Campos
Politólogo/Estudiante, Georgetown University
Vita Giovanna Randazzo Eisemann
Estudiante de la Maestría Internacional de Derechos Humanos y Democratización, Universidad
Nacional de San Martín (UNSAM)
Francesca Randazzo
Doctoranda, Poeta, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela
Lirio Gutierrez Rivera Postdoctoral
Researcher, Desigualdades Research Network, Free University Berlin
Mirta Macias Ruano
Profesora UNAH
Karen Bahr
Investigadora, Université catholique de Louvain
Allan Fajardo Reina
Sociólogo, profesor universitario
Melba Reyes
Trabajadora social y economista, militante feminista, profesional del desarrollo de base, ex candidata
vicepresidencial
Camila Pastor de María y Campos
Antropóloga, CIDE
Oscar L. Estrada
Cineasta y Escritor
Signatories in solidarity from other countries:
Ricardo J. Kaliman, Professor, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argentina
Adriana Martinez, Senior Researcher, UNLP, Argentina
Constanta Tabbush, Researcher, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tomas Varnagy, Professor, Universidad de Buenos Aires/ Universidad Nacional del Sur, ArgentinaAlejandro Liberman, Professor, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
José Vales, Professor, Di Tella University, Argentina
Paula Daniela Fernandez, Licenciada en Antropología, Universidad de Buenos Aires/ Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina
Fernando Romero Wimer, Magíster en Desarrollo y Gestión Territorial, Universidad Nacional del Sur/Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata/CEISO, Argentina
Guillermo Almeyra, Doctor en Ciencias Políticas., CLACSO, Argentina
Aryeh Shell, Rotary World Peace Fellow and MA candidate in International Relations, Universidad del Salvador, Argentina
Ben Tofsmith, Student, University of Melbourne, Australia
Jorge Derpic, PhD student, Universit of Texas-Austin, Bolivia
Andre Miccolis, MA, Nugobio/ Universidad Catolica Brasilia, Brazil
Renata Andrade, PhD, Nugobio/ Universidad Catolica Brasilia, Brazil
Bernardo Fernandes, Professor, UNSP, Brazil
Marcella Carvelho, Graduate Student, UFRS Brazil, Brazil
Patricia Landolt, Professor, University of Toronto, Canada
Gabriela Aceves, PhD Candidate, Univ. of British Columbia Canada, Canada
Tal Nilson, PhD Fellow, University of British Colombia, Canada
Alberto Guevara, Associate Professor, York University, Canada
Lisa Kowalchuck, Associate Professor, University of Guelph, Canada
Ramón Victoriano, Professor, UT Mississauga, Canada
Patricia Landolt, Professor, University of Toronto, Canada
Liz Molnar, Graduate Student, University of Pittsburgh, Canada
Juan Carlos Medal, Student, University of California Davis, Chile
Mario Garves, Dr., Universidad de Santiago, Chile
Ed Unen C., PhD Sociology, Universidad del Valle, Colombia
Javier Deaza, Assist. Prof., Universidad Javeriana, Colombia
Angela Franco, Profesaro Asociado, U. del Valle, Colombia
Marco A. Melo Moreno, Ph.D Student, UNAL Bogotá, Colombia
Carolina Galindo, Profesora Asistente, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia
Alberto Mora Román, Coordinador de Investigación, Programa Estado de la Nación, Costa Rica
Daniel Diaz M., Writer, UNEAC, Cuba
Carida Masson, Investigadora, ICIC Juan Marinello, Cuba
Laura González C, Antropóloga, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Ecuador
Mario Ramos, Historiador, Centro Andino de Estudios Estratégicos, Ecuador
Helios Figuerola Pujol, anthropologist, Univ. René Descartes, Francia
Almut Schilling-Vacaflor, Research Fellow, GIGA/Univeristy of Hamburg, Germany
Michael Lukos, Professor, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Germany
Daniela Dreissig, Political Scientist (MA), Germany
Arturo Arias, Professor of Latin American Literatures and Cultures, University of Texas at Austin, Guatemala
Barry Cannon, Dr., Dublin City University, Ireland
Astrid O. Andersen, PhD Fellow, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Atalia Shragui, PhD Fellow, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Flavia Echanove, Professor, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México
Oliver Meza, PhD Public Policy, CIDE, México
Ricardo Macip, Research Prof., ICSyH–BUAP Mex., México
Jaime Preciado, Dr., Universidad de Guadalajara, México
Laura Carlsen, Director, Americas Program of the Center for International Policy, MéxicoHilda I. Cota, teacher, Universidad Claustro S. J., México
Nayeli Glz., Tecnológico de Monterey, México
Juan Meza, PhD Candidate, UA Baja California, México
Agustin Escobar, Professor, CIESAS, México
Adriana Spindola, Professor, UDIA, México
Gail Mummert, Professor, El Colegio de Michoacan, México
Manuel Angel Castillo, Professor and Researcher, El Colegio de México, México
Enrique de la Garza, Professor, UAM, México
Sergio A. Sánchez D., Professor, CIESAS, México
Maria da Gloria Marrón, Dra. Sociología Investigadora, Universidad Autónoma De Puebla, México
Salvador Aquino, Professor, CIESAS, México
Sonja Wolf, Investigadora, Instituto para la Seguridad y la Democracia, México
Aaron Pollack, Professor/Researcher, Instituto de Investigaciones Dr. José María Luis Mora, México
Manuel Esparza, Anthropologist, INAH Oaxaca, México
Ethelia Ruiz Medrano, Professor of History, National Institute of Anthropology and History, México
Olivier Guilhem, Investigador, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México
Carmiña Ruiz Medrano, Maestra, Universidad de Guanajuato, México
Alejandro de Avila, Director, Jardín Etnobotánico de Oaxaca, México
Romana Falcón, Profesora -investigadora, El Colegio de México, México
Lorenzo Meyer, Profesor- investigador, El Colegio de México, México
Manuel Esparza, Antropólogo, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México
María de los Ángeles Romero Frizzi, Historiadora, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México
Jorge García, Assistant Professor, Ithaca College, México
Coralia Gutiérrez Álvarez, Doctora en Historia, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México
Sabina Longhitano, Associate professor of Literature, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México
Alejandro Rivadeneyra Pasquel, Restaurador del Patrimonio Histórico y Cultural, México
Lidia E. Gómez García, Profesor Investigador, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México
Gloria Artís Mercadet, Antropóloga, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, México
Maricela Sánchez de la Barquera, Dra. en Psicoterapia, Universidad Intercontinental, México
Barbara Hogenborm, Associate Professor, CEDLA, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Rolando Vasquez, Doctor, Roosevelt Academy, Netherlands
Jeff Handmaker, Senior Lecturer, Erasmus University, Netherlands
Julie Cupples, Associate Professor of Human Geography, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Simon Springer, Lecturer, University of Otago, New Zealand
Aynn Setright, Academic Director, SIT Study Abroad, Nicaragua
Axel Barchgrevink, Senior Researcher, NUPI, Norway
Michael Seltzer, Professor, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway
Livic Letts, Master Student, PUCP, Peru
Jorge V.Vega, Asist., Univ. Nac. Icayao, Peru
Cesar Barzan Seminario, Abogado, Instituto de Defensa Legal, Peru
Nina Wiesehomeier, Research Fellow, ICS-UL Lisbon, Portugal
Julio Acosta (Julin), Independiente, Rep. Dominicana
Mo Hume, Lecturer in Politics, University of Glasgow, Scotland
Klam D. Vervuert, PhD, Publisher, Iberoamerican Publishing Corporation, Spain
Simon Bornschier, Lecturer, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Sandra Contzen, Research Assistant, University of Zurich, Switzerland
John Strowers, Associate Professor, SOAS Universit of London, UKLeigh Payne, Professor, University of Oxford, UK
Owen Logan, Researcher, University of Aberdeen, UK
Haas Eferton, Librarian, Oxford University, UK
Francesca Lesea, Research Assistant, Univ. of Oxford, UK
Cara Levey, Teaching Fellow, Univ. of Leeds, UK
Fiona Macaulay, Senior Lecturer, University of Bradford, UK
Anthony Hall, Professor, LSE, UK
Marina Prieto-Carron, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Portsmouth, UK
Patricia Oliart, Lecturer, Newcastle University, UK, Peru
Benjamin Dangl, Investigador Independiente, USA
Gerardo Renique, Associate Professor, City University of New York, USA
Fredo Rivera, PhD Candidate, Duke University, USA
Shannon Speed, Assistant Professor, UT Austin, USA
Zachary Brittson, Asst. Prof Spanish, Texas Tech Univ., USA
Chistina Paneno, Associate Professor, Northeastern Illinois University, USA
Gisela Fosada, Assist. Editor, Duke University Press, USA
Brett Williams, Professor of Anthropology, American University, USA
Antoninetter Hertel, Associate Professor, St. Joseph’s College New York, USA
Ben Kohl, Associate Professor, Temple University, USA
Brad Baltz, PhD Student, University of North Carolia Chapel Hill, USA
Hayley Froysland, Associate Professor, Indiana University South Bend, USA
Mariano Bonialidad, PhD, Colegio Internacional, USA
Dan Reichman, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Rochester, USA
Simeon Newman, Research Data Analyst, University of California Berkeley, USA
Bryan McNeil, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, American University, USA
Susan Eckste, Professor, Boston University, USA
Juan Poblete, Professor, University of California Santa Cruz, USA
Gloria LaRiva, Coordinator, National Committee to Free the Cuban 5, USA
David W. Foster, Professor, Arizona State University, USA
Jan Strout, Organizer, US Women & Cuba Collaboration, USA
Hannah Gibson, Student/Presenter, University of California San Diego, USA
John French, Professor, Duke University, USA
Patricia Olsen, Associate Professor of History, Illinois State University, USA
E. Montesumo, Associate Professor, University of Colorado, USA
Satya Pattnayak, Director of Latin American Studies, Villanova University, USA
A. Winograd, Student, Univeristy of Texas, USA
Juan Gonzalez Espitin, Professor, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, USA
Patricia Tome, Professor, Rollins College, USA
Kelli Carrasco, Student, University of Texas, USA
Cameron Johnson, Student, University of California Davis, USA
Nathan Jones, Student, Stanford University, USA
Joshua Price, Professor, Binghamton University, USA
Josefina Saldariz, Associate Professor, New York University, USA
Alex Vazquez, Professor, Princeton, USA
Jose Munoz, Professor, New York University, USA
David Carey, Professor of History, U of Southern Maine, USA
Walter Little, Assoc. Prof Anthro, SUNY-Albany, USA
Benjamin Goldfrank, Assoc. Professor, Seton Hall Univ., USA
Douglas Friedman, Assoc. Prof., College of Charleston, USADaniel Nunez, Teaching Fellow, Univ.of Pittsburgh USA, USA
Thomas Ward, Prof. of Spanish, Loyola University USA, USA
Jim Quesada, Prof. Anthropology, San Francisco State University, USA
Diego Alonso, Prof. Spanish, Reed College, USA
Victoria Garrett Assistant Prof. Spanish, Asst. Prof Spanish, WVU, USA
Amy Olen, PhD Candidate, Univ. of Texas Austin USA, USA
John Lindsey-Poland, Research Director, Fellowship of Reconciliation, USA
Robert Weis, Assist.Professor, Univ. of Northern CO, USA
Edgardo Moctezuma, President, Latin American Book Source, USA
Sinclair Thomson, Assoc. Prof., New York University, USA
Clara E. Randerson, Assoc. Prof., Lesley University, USA
Sarah Romano, Graduate Student, Univ. of CA Santa Cruz, USA
Andres Uribe, Graduate Student, San Francisco State University, USA
Sarah Ohmer, Professor, U Indy, USA
Scott Icke, Professor, University South Florida, USA
Brian Harrington, Editor Coordinator, Johns Hopkins Press, USA
Dawn King, Professor, Lehigh, USA
Daniel Olanes, Graduate Student, University of California Santa Barbara, USA
Steven Osura, Graduate Student, UCSB, USA
Jeffrey Rubin, Professor, Boston Univ., USA
Ellen H. Brow, retired Librarian, none, USA
Wm. H. Brow, teacher, NA, USA
Héctor Dominguez – Ruvalcaba, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Emily Achtenberg, Communicator, NACLA, USA
Jamie Rogers, Graduate Student, University of California at Irvine, USA
Elisabeth Jay Friedman, Associate Professor, University of San Francisco, USA
William Kenah, Instructor, LBCC, USA
Joshua Rosenthal, Associate Professor West Connceticut State Univesity,, Western Connecticut State University, USA
Elizabeth Roberts, Assistant Professor, University of Michigan, USA
Lisa Gardinier, Librarian, University of Iowa, USA
Jadwiga Pieper, Associate Professor, University of Arizona, USA
Jean Weisman, Retired Academic Advisor, City College of New York, USA
Michael B. Wise, Professor, Willamette University, USA
Kirsten Weld, Associate Professor, Harvard University, USA
Karen L. Wald, Retired Teacher, Escuela Popular, California, USA
Steve Cote, Professor, Ohio University, USA
Natalia Milanesio, Assistant Professor, University of Houston, USA
Luis H. Castañeda, Assistant Professor, Middlebury College, USA
Laura Lesta, Graduate Student, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Seth Holmes, Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley, USA
Elizabeth Cartwright, Professor, Idaho State University, USA
Christina Faegri, Graduate Student, University of Southern California, USA
Iliana Portaro, Graduate Student, UC Davis, USA
Mark Chernick, Professor, Georgetown University, USA
Maureen Shea, Professor, Tulane University, USA
Annie Wilkinson, Student, FLACSO, Ecuador, USA
Mark Hertzman, Professor, Columbia University, USA
Linda Green, Professor, University of Arizona, USACindy Forster, Professor, Scripps College, USA
Ann Blum, Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA
Felix S. Kury, Professor, San Francisco State University, USA
Jean Díaz, Retired, UCR, USA
Shana Harris, Medical Anthropolgist, UCSF/Berkeley, USA
Donna Goldstein, Professor, University of Colorado-Boulder, USA
Jill S. Kuhnheim, Professor, University of Kansas, USA
Catherine Benamou, Associate Professor, UC Irvine, USA
David Wrathall, Post-doc, UC Santa Cruz, USA
Nancy Churchill, Professor, CUNY, USA
William Morgan, Adjunct Professor, Lone Star College, USA
Paul Posner, Associate Professor, Clark University, USA
Joseph Pierce, PhD Student, UT Austin, USA
Gavin Arnall, Graduate Student, Princeton, USA
Ana Jabau, Graduate Student, Princeton, USA
Kathleen McAfee, Associate Professor, San Francisco State University, USA
Wendy Vogt, Assistant Professor, IVPUI, USA
Victoria Kill, Professor of English, Seattle University, USA
Adrienne Pine, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, American University, USA
Robin O’Brian, Associate Professor, Elmira College, USA
Katherine Borland, Associate Professor of Comparative Studies, The Ohio State University, USA
John Tutino, Professor of History and International Affairs, Georgetown University, USA
Sarah England, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Soka University, USA
Emilio del Valle Escalante, Assistant Professor of Spanish, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Justin Wolfe, Associate Professor of History, Tulane University, USA
Susanne Jonas, Dra., University of California at Santa Cruz, USA
Richard Grossman, Instructor/History, Northeastern Illinois University, USA
Kendra McSweeney, Associate Professor of Geography, Ohio State University, USA
Christopher L Chiappari, Associate Professor of Sociology/Anthropology, St. Olaf College, USA
Beth Baker-Cristales, Associate Professor of Anthropology, California State University, Los Angeles, USA
Zoe Pearson, PhD Student, Ohio State University, USA
J. Kehaulani Kauanui, Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Studies, Wesleyan University, USA
Jacalyn Harden, Assistant Professor, Wayne State University, USA
Sue Wilson, Anthropologist, UAPD, USA
Rosemary A. Joyce, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Steve McFarland, Doctoral Candidate, CUNY, USA
Nicholas Crane, Ph.D. Student, The Ohio State University, USA
Paul Susman, Prof. of Geography, Bucknell University, USA
Joseph Nevins, Associate Professor of Geography, Vassar College, USA
Marcin Grodzki, lecturer, SUNY Cortland, USA
Dana Frank, Professor of History, University of California at Santa Cruz, USA
Joe Bryan, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Colorado – Boulder, USA
Jesse McClelland, PhD Student, Geography, University of Washington, USA
Salvatore Engel-Di Mauro, Associate Professor of Geography, SUNY New Paltz, USA
Kathleen McAfee, Associate Professor of International Relations, San Francisco State University, USA
David Sweeney Coombs, Postdoctoral Fellow, Wesleyan University, USAWilliam Stanley Stewart, Professor Emeritus, California State University, Chico, USA
Sasha Davis, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Hawaii – Hilo, USA
Kiran Asher, Associate Professor, Clark University, USA
Yajaira Padilla, Associate Professor of Latin American Literature, The University of Kansas, USA
Brittany Davis, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Arizona, USA
Susan Kellogg, Professor of History, University of Houston, USA
Richard Cameron, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Robley E. George, Director, Center for the Study of Democratic Societies, USA
Bruce Calder, Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Cynthia Haq, MD, Professor of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
Katherine Hoyt, Co-Director, Nicaragua Network, USA
Lynn Stephen, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, University of Oregon, USA
Russ Davidson, Professor Emeritus, University of New México, USA
Revathi A-Davidson, Healthcare Administrator, Presbyterian, USA
Al Gedicks, Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, USA
Jeron E. Donalds, Engineer, USA
Walter Sherwood, Professor Emeritus, Sacramento City College, USA
Allan Fisher, Professor of English as a Second Language, City College of San Francisco, USA
Michael A. Collins, PhD, Professor of Molecular Pharmacology, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Seth Holmes, Assistant Professor of Health and Social Behavior, University of California Berkeley, USA
Marc Becker, Professor, Truman State University, USA
Altha Cravey, Associate Professor of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Steve Watrous, Sociologist, Milwaukee Area Technical College, USA
Dvera Saxton, Anthropologist, American University, USA
Jean Handy, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Carwil Bjork-James, Adjunct Lecturer, City University of New York Graduate Center, USA
Avril L. de la Cretaz, Ph.D, Research Assistant Professor (retired), University of Massachusetts – Amherst, USA
Edward E Calnek, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Rochester, USA
Gregory Scott Harris, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Karen Kampwirth, Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Latin American Studies program, Knox College, USA
Cecilia Menjívar, Cowden Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Arizona State University, USA
Maurice L. Wade, Professor of Philosophy, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA
Luis Figueroa, Associate Professor of History, Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut), USA
Jeffrey Paul Bayliss, Associate Professor of History, Trinity College, USA
Sandra Vriwn, PhD Candidate, University of California at Berkeley, USA
Rachel Brahinsky, Researcher, PhD Candidate, University of California at Berkeley, USA
Marc Zimmerman, Prof. Emeritus, U. of Houston, U. of Illinois Chicago, USA
Melody Nixon, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Ursinus College, USA
Leisy Abrego, Assistant Professor, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
G. Munsey, Masters Student in Geography, San Francisco State University, USA
Alexander Tarr, PhD Candidate, University of California at Berkeley, USA
Rhonda Neugebauer, Latin American Studies, University of California, Riverside, USA
Jonathan Fox, Professor and Dept. Chair, Latin American and Latino Studies Dept, University of
California, Santa Cruz, USA
Xóchitl Bada, Assistant Professor in Latin American and Latino Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Hector Perla, Assistant Professor, USA
Deborah Goldsmith, Economics Instructor, City College of San Francisco, USA
Lia Smith, ESL Instructor, City College of San Francisco, USA
Bie Tan, Instructor, CCSF, USA
Dina Ciraulo, Faculty, City College of San Francisco, USA
Melissa McPeters, Profesora, City College of San Francisco, USA
Denise L. Jindrich, Instructor, English as a Second Language, City College of San Francisco, USA
Steve Swingle, Instructor, City College of San Francisco, USA
Marleni Quintano, Teacher, City College of San Francisco, USA
Rodger Kent Scott, Ph.D., Instructor, City College of San Francisco, USA
William B. Taylor, Professor of History, Emeritus, University of California at Berkeley, USA
Georgene St. Peter, Administrative Assistant, History Department, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA
Dora Palacios, Anthropologist, CCSF, USA
Jennifer Casolo, Geográfa, Investigadora Asociada, USA
Bruce Neuburger, English teacher, City College of San Francisco, USA
Laura Roush, Professor, Colegio de Michoacan, USA/México
Maria Cristina Parra, Professor, Universidad de Zulia, Venezuela
Veronica Zubillaga, Professor, Universidad Simón Bolivar, Venezuela
Maia Rodriguez, Profesora, Earlham College, Venezuela

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2 thoughts on “Scholars and Human Rights Organizations Demand End to U.S. Military and Police Aid in Honduras

  1. Pingback: Acadêmicos denunciam ajuda dos Estados Unidos à repressão em Honduras « Viomundo – O que você não vê na mídia

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